Civil parish – Witheridge Devon http://witheridge-devon.com/ Wed, 25 May 2022 07:22:41 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://witheridge-devon.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/devon-150x150.png Civil parish – Witheridge Devon http://witheridge-devon.com/ 32 32 Mandeville pastor and others hope to resurrect historic church https://witheridge-devon.com/mandeville-pastor-and-others-hope-to-resurrect-historic-church/ Wed, 25 May 2022 03:52:51 +0000 https://witheridge-devon.com/mandeville-pastor-and-others-hope-to-resurrect-historic-church/ ST. TAMMANY PARISH (WGNO) – Magnolia Baptist Church is inactive on Fairview Drive in St. Tammany Parish. Looking at a map, Magnolia Baptist is near Madisonville, but in the late 1800s it was an area known as Houltonville, a predominantly black woodland community. It may be hard to imagine when looking at Magnolia Baptist Church […]]]>

ST. TAMMANY PARISH (WGNO) – Magnolia Baptist Church is inactive on Fairview Drive in St. Tammany Parish. Looking at a map, Magnolia Baptist is near Madisonville, but in the late 1800s it was an area known as Houltonville, a predominantly black woodland community.

It may be hard to imagine when looking at Magnolia Baptist Church that less than ten years ago services were held in the nearly abandoned church. The church congregation no longer met once their pastor, the Reverend Frank Sheridan, died.

“The church was actually left in ruins, and I walked by one day and said, ‘That can’t be.’ There’s too much history here. It’s part of history, of a culture that is very important to our community,” said Donald Burris, pastor of Goodwill Missionary Baptist Church.

Burris, along with historical curator Bonnie Dennis, who is a member of local and state chapters of the National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution, are currently working to restore and preserve Magnolia Baptist Church, so that it can be recognized as a historical monument. and, again, serving the community.

“It was very important in the civil rights movement,” Dennis explained. “It was very important in this area in terms of the black community, to have a place and a sense of community. This church has been instrumental for them in terms of bringing this community together and maintaining it.

Formerly known as Eagle Eye Baptist Church, Magnolia Baptist was built in 1906 and served as the primary place of worship for the residents of Houltonville.

“Some of them knew the fighting, but again they didn’t lose faith. They haven’t lost hope,” Burris said.

The church has no electricity or running water, so right now that’s their biggest obstacle. Burris and Dennis hope the community can step in.

“So if we could get someone to donate money or services to get the investigation, for example,” Dennis said. “We have a tree hanging over the side threatening the side of the church at the moment, so there are some real basic things that need to take place to secure the facility.”

Burris and Dennis are also working to establish a nonprofit organization, the Magnolia Baptist Church Foundation, for tax-deductible donations.

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Church of Scotland approves same-sex marriages https://witheridge-devon.com/church-of-scotland-approves-same-sex-marriages/ Mon, 23 May 2022 13:11:38 +0000 https://witheridge-devon.com/church-of-scotland-approves-same-sex-marriages/ The Church of Scotland has voted to allow parish ministers and deacons to marry same-sex couples if they wish. At the 2022 General Assembly of the Church of Scotland on Monday, 274 commissioners voted in favor of the decision and 136 against. They approved an overture to amend a permanent church law to allow parish […]]]>

The Church of Scotland has voted to allow parish ministers and deacons to marry same-sex couples if they wish.

At the 2022 General Assembly of the Church of Scotland on Monday, 274 commissioners voted in favor of the decision and 136 against.

They approved an overture to amend a permanent church law to allow parish ministers, known as ministers of Word and Sacrament, and deacons to apply to become celebrants authorized to hold gay ceremonies.

A report to the General Assembly makes clear that no one would be required to participate in the solemnization of a same-sex marriage or be involved in its preparations unless they explicitly wish to do so.

All celebrants should consider “the peace and unity and pastoral needs of the congregation and any parish or other grouping of which it is a part” when considering holding a same-sex marriage ceremony.

The Reverend Craig Dobney was among those who urged the commissioners to approve same-sex marriage.

He said: “I have seen the heartbreak of those who have same-sex relationships in our congregations and cannot marry in their home church, despite being devout Christians. Getting married, in front of their ecclesiastical families, would mean everything to them, but they weren’t capable of it.

“I fear that our churches are no longer relevant to our communities.

“We can stay in our ivory towers, in our marble mansions, in our granite buildings and sit there thinking with joy that we are following the scriptures by keeping people from coming to our churches, by making people undesirable .

“We talk about being a welcoming church, sometimes I have to question that. In fact, the question we should ask ourselves, are we, as a church, welcome in our communities? »

The Reverend Scott Rennie urged the commissioners to support the opening, describing the wedding as a “wonderful thing”.

He said: “My marriage to my husband, Dave, fuels my life and my ministry and frankly I don’t think I could be a minister of this church without his love and support, he is always there in the background .”

However, others questioned whether approving the move would put pressure on people to get involved in same-sex marriages even if they didn’t want to, or make it more of a personal matter for ministers. rather than for the institution of the church.

Reverend Ben Thorp said: “Although we have guarantees that there will be no civil action and that it will be legal, the court of public opinion is still very strong on this and it is certainly possible that churches that choose not to – if this motion passes – could still be targeted.

“If we choose in favor of this motion it will cease to become an institutional position and will become a personal decision and individual ministers will make a personal decision and when asked can you marry us the answer will have to be no, because that I choose not to, rather than not, is something that I cannot do, and it also creates pastoral difficulties for everyone on both sides of the debate, so I think we have to be very aware of these tensions that are here.

Meanwhile, Covenant Fellowship Scotland, a think tank of evangelicals within the Church of Scotland, called the decision “unbiblical and sinful”.

Public figures hailed the decision, including former Scottish Conservative leader Ruth Davidson and former Scottish Labor leader Kezia Dugdale, both of whom have same-sex relationships.

Baroness Davidson tweeted: “Glad to see the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland has voted to allow ministers to conduct same-sex marriages.

“Thank you to those who showed grace and care as the church moved closer and closer to this point.”

Ms Dugdale described it as ‘wonderful news and progress’.

Under the legislation, a person would have to apply to the Principal Registrar’s office to become an officiant and an application would then be made to the Registrar General of Scotland on their behalf.

The Reverend James Bissett, an Inverness area minister, tweeted: “I have just emailed the Principal Registrar’s office at @churchscotland requesting that I be registered as an officiant of same sex marriages.”

Only a parish minister-turned-celebrant will be permitted to use a church building in his charge for the solemnization of same-sex marriages, however, he may authorize other celebrants to use the building for this purpose.

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Politics Live: Ministers brace for release of Sue Gray’s ‘stomach turning’ report after police probe into party ends | Political news https://witheridge-devon.com/politics-live-ministers-brace-for-release-of-sue-grays-stomach-turning-report-after-police-probe-into-party-ends-political-news/ Fri, 20 May 2022 06:10:15 +0000 https://witheridge-devon.com/politics-live-ministers-brace-for-release-of-sue-grays-stomach-turning-report-after-police-probe-into-party-ends-political-news/ The Sinn Fein leader has admitted to Sky News that the Northern Ireland Protocol as it stands poses problems for businesses. Speaking on Sky News’ Beth Rigby interview programme, Mary Lou McDonald said “the fact that Brexit has thrown this paper blizzard, in some cases, is problematic”. Ms McDonald also said the UK’s proposal to […]]]>

The Sinn Fein leader has admitted to Sky News that the Northern Ireland Protocol as it stands poses problems for businesses.

Speaking on Sky News’ Beth Rigby interview programme, Mary Lou McDonald said “the fact that Brexit has thrown this paper blizzard, in some cases, is problematic”.

Ms McDonald also said the UK’s proposal to ‘legislate to break the law’ is ‘an extremely dangerous place to go’ and that she ‘absolutely’ believes a border poll – a unification referendum – will take place over the next decade.

Earlier this week, Foreign Secretary Liz Truss outlined plans to change the protocol.

She told the Commons that the UK was facing a ‘very grave and serious situation’ and that without the UK government addressing the problems caused by the Northern Ireland protocol, the power-sharing executive of Stormont cannot be reinstated.

Britain says it does not want to abandon the arrangement and would prefer to reach a negotiated settlement.

But Sinn Féin, which became the first nationalist party to win the most seats in the Northern Ireland Assembly in its 101-year history earlier this month, said the proposal would breach international law .

Sinn Féin has accused the UK government of co-ordinating with the “obstruction tactics” of its political opponents in the DUP who are unhappy with the protocol, which governs Northern Ireland’s post-Brexit trade deals.

Speaking to Sky News political editor Beth Rigby, Ms McDonald said: “I think the UK government’s decision to go international, actually worse than that, to legislate to break the law is a place extremely dangerous.

“I think it demonstrates very bad faith, in fact I think it amplifies the kind of bad faith we’ve seen from Boris Johnson’s government since Brexit and it certainly doesn’t matter, let me repeating it, does nothing to assist in the much needed goal of urgently and immediately establishing an Executive Government in the North of Ireland.”

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An Easter Vigil like no other: New Catholic follows Confirmation with wedding vows – BC Catholic https://witheridge-devon.com/an-easter-vigil-like-no-other-new-catholic-follows-confirmation-with-wedding-vows-bc-catholic/ Tue, 17 May 2022 19:38:54 +0000 https://witheridge-devon.com/an-easter-vigil-like-no-other-new-catholic-follows-confirmation-with-wedding-vows-bc-catholic/ In the happy times following the end of last month’s Easter Vigil at St. Joseph’s in Port Moody, nine of the 10 men and women who were baptized or confirmed that evening began to leave the sanctuary with their families and their friends, most heading to a gathering celebration in the adjoining church hall. But […]]]>

In the happy times following the end of last month’s Easter Vigil at St. Joseph’s in Port Moody, nine of the 10 men and women who were baptized or confirmed that evening began to leave the sanctuary with their families and their friends, most heading to a gathering celebration in the adjoining church hall.

But there was one left – Mark Witecki, a 28-year-old electrician who had been confirmed that evening. Removing his red Confirmation dress to reveal his black tuxedo, Witecki stayed behind because he had planned his own special celebration, one that would see him receive an additional sacrament that night: the Holy Matrimony.

Witecki was soon joined at the altar by Danda Santos, a 38-year-old financial day-trader. With only a few relatives present as witnesses, they were married within half an hour.

The unusual moment of the wedding ceremony culminated a remarkable journey for the couple, which not only led them to discover their love for each other, but also saw Mark embrace the Catholic faith and, in the process, bring Danda to kiss hers again.

The two met through an online dating service and started dating a few years ago, Danda said in an interview. As their relationship grew, so did their interest in the Church.

Danda, a graduate of Archbishop Carney Regional Secondary in Port Coquitlam, had an “on again, off again” relationship with her faith, while Mark, who had not been raised in any religion, sought.

After Mark’s mother became a Catholic and began attending mass at Christ the King in Langley, Mark began catechism classes there and was eventually baptized.

“While he was doing his catechism, I asked if I could join him because I had no more practice,” Danda said. “Basically, I knew I could really learn something. My other thought was that we’re starting to get pretty serious here, and if we’re going to raise our kids in the Church, I want to know what you’re learning.

Danda, a divorced woman who was previously married in a civil ceremony, said she had longed to return to the Church for years but felt she was not worthy. “I felt like I didn’t deserve forgiveness,” she said. “I didn’t deserve God’s love.”

Her journey of faith allowed her to realize that “it is never too late to realize that you belong”.

The couple made plans for a church wedding at a Vancouver-area parish in late February, but last-minute complications arose that forced them to change their plans. With relatives arriving from the Philippines and with other arrangements already confirmed, they decided to marry in a civil ceremony and seek a new parish for a church wedding later.

This brought them to St. Joseph’s in Port Moody, where Mark completed his RCIA studies leading to his confirmation. With the couple wanting to wed as soon as possible after confirmation, Pastor Father Mark McGuckin suggested a ceremony after the Easter Vigil.

In the weeks leading up to the ceremony, the couple moved into separate rooms in their Coquitlam apartment and made sure they were in a state of grace before taking their sacred vows.

They credit an archdiocesan advisor with advising them on this course of action. “She really helped frame it for us, so it became really important to give to each other in the purest form possible,” Danda said.

“It was definitely very important to me to be married in that state of grace. It felt like it was the purest form of love that we could be united, in the Church, and really receive the sacraments in the best possible way.

Mark said he was grateful to have communicated with Father McGuckin. “We found St. Joseph by the grace of God,” he said. “God has a plan for us. He put us in touch with one of the best priests we have ever met.

Now married in the Church, the couple is looking forward to having children and raising a Catholic family. It’s unclear exactly where this will take place, as Mark and Danda are leaving Canada for a few months to figure out if they should move to another country.

If there’s a lesson to be learned from the couple’s story, it’s “never give up,” said Mark, who is delighted he and Danda haven’t given up on their desire to get married at the moment. Church.

Danda accepted. “It’s amazing,” she said of her church wedding. “It’s such an amazing feeling, and I feel so blessed that we were able to do this.”

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Activists want women to be at the forefront of parish development model https://witheridge-devon.com/activists-want-women-to-be-at-the-forefront-of-parish-development-model/ Sun, 15 May 2022 14:00:44 +0000 https://witheridge-devon.com/activists-want-women-to-be-at-the-forefront-of-parish-development-model/ Threats to tenure security present clear and direct threats to income and food security. Kampala, Uganda | THE INDEPENDENT | Economic justice activists fear that the anticipated intentions of the parochial-PDM development model will not be fully realized if women are not allowed equal or even greater participation in its implementation. The program is a […]]]>
Threats to tenure security present clear and direct threats to income and food security.

Kampala, Uganda | THE INDEPENDENT | Economic justice activists fear that the anticipated intentions of the parochial-PDM development model will not be fully realized if women are not allowed equal or even greater participation in its implementation.

The program is a new strategy designed to improve household incomes and move Ugandans from a subsistence economy to a cash economy. It aims to organize and deliver public and private sector interventions for wealth creation and job creation at parish level as the lowest economic planning unit of the community.

The PDM program which is anchored on seven pillars of its implementation emphasizes agriculture, marketing and the value chain. When it was established, the government allocated 17 million shillings to each Parish Cooperative Society and pledged to disburse 100 million shillings in the next financial year to support members’ income-generating projects.

But Elliot Orizaarwa, executive director of the Women and Girls Development Association – WEGCDA, wants program implementers to boost women’s participation by deliberately prioritizing businesses that favor them, instead of being treated as secondary beneficiaries. The association seeks to break down barriers to women’s economic justice.

She fears that because the program is going to be run locally, it is likely to be very competitive and by default will benefit men more than their female counterparts, hence their marginalization.

To bridge the gap, Orizaarwa says they have considered engaging the architects and supervisors of the program at the various levels of implementation, to appreciate their concerns so that they can remove any bottlenecks that may be hindering Women’s. Ideally, she says, program implementers should consider operating within some of the different women’s formations that exist.

Joan Akikunda, Gender and Legal Officer at WEGCDA also recommends that program implementers give women equal access and participation in the economic decision-making process, as well as ensure that they remain free from any form of abuse that may result from their financial empowerment. .

She called on parish leaders and community development workers as key implementers to ensure that women receive timely and accurate information about the program, to enable them to follow closely and potentially benefit from it.

Florence Nakandi, program manager at the Community Transformation Foundation Network-COTFONE; a civil society organization operating in the greater Masaka sub-region, challenges the government to involve civil society actors who can represent or even empower women in decision-making.

“We would like women to be effectively involved in the process of selecting beneficiary companies, so that their preferences are taken into account,” she noted.

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URN

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EUP Principals Recognize Dozens of Accomplished Students at Awards Banquet https://witheridge-devon.com/eup-principals-recognize-dozens-of-accomplished-students-at-awards-banquet/ Thu, 12 May 2022 10:03:36 +0000 https://witheridge-devon.com/eup-principals-recognize-dozens-of-accomplished-students-at-awards-banquet/ Each year, the EUP Secondary Principal Association recognizes the most academically successful high school students in the Eastern Upper Peninsula with the EUP Principals Award. To be eligible for the award, students must have a GPA of 3.3 or higher and a minimum SAT score of 1160 or a minimum ACT score of 24. To […]]]>

Each year, the EUP Secondary Principal Association recognizes the most academically successful high school students in the Eastern Upper Peninsula with the EUP Principals Award.

To be eligible for the award, students must have a GPA of 3.3 or higher and a minimum SAT score of 1160 or a minimum ACT score of 24.

To celebrate the students, the EUP Secondary Principals’ Association hosts an annual banquet at the Grand Hotel on Mackinac Island where these students can be recognized and rewarded. This year, winners from each eligible school district have been announced.

Brimley students

Stephanie Bishop is a member of Student Council, Key Club, National Honor Society, and Robotics. Bishop is studying psychology at Lake Superior State University.

Colin Hopper is a football player and biker, he plans to be a postman after graduation.

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Northern Colorado Parish Church tagged with pro-abortion graffiti; police investigate – Catholic World Report https://witheridge-devon.com/northern-colorado-parish-church-tagged-with-pro-abortion-graffiti-police-investigate-catholic-world-report/ Mon, 09 May 2022 23:55:27 +0000 https://witheridge-devon.com/northern-colorado-parish-church-tagged-with-pro-abortion-graffiti-police-investigate-catholic-world-report/ Vandalism at St. John XXIII Parish in Fort Collins, Colorado on May 7, 2022. / Eileen Pulse Denver, Colorado, May 9, 2022 / 3:35 p.m. (CNA). A northern Colorado Catholic parish church known for its active pro-life ministry was vandalized with pro-abortion graffiti over the weekend. St. John XXIII Parish in Fort Collins, about an […]]]>
Vandalism at St. John XXIII Parish in Fort Collins, Colorado on May 7, 2022. / Eileen Pulse

Denver, Colorado, May 9, 2022 / 3:35 p.m. (CNA).

A northern Colorado Catholic parish church known for its active pro-life ministry was vandalized with pro-abortion graffiti over the weekend.

St. John XXIII Parish in Fort Collins, about an hour north of Denver, was the latest target in Colorado following similar graffiti discovered at a Boulder parish several days earlier.

Images shared with CNA show red spray-painted inscriptions of “My Body My Choice” and a symbol that appears to be an “A” meaning “anarchy”. Police said the incident happened at around 1.15am on Saturday May 7 and “exterior glass panels” were also smashed.

St. John XXIII is located near the Colorado State University campus and has served many of the college’s Catholic students since its founding in the 1960s. The parish is located just around the corner from an abortion clinic Planned Parenthood.

Luke Hecker, a project manager at the parish, told CNA that the parish is known for its pro-life advocacy, with parishioners frequently crossing the street to protest peacefully outside the abortion clinic, directly across from the college.

Hecker said he was “saddened, but not too surprised” that the parish was targeted.

“It’s very obvious to the community that John XXIII is a very pro-life parish,” he said, noting that the parish is currently raising funds from Catholic Charities and Marisol Health to open a pro-life pregnancy center. -lives in a vacant building that she then owns. door.

The graffiti incident comes after the May 2 revelation of a leaked U.S. Supreme Court draft opinion suggesting the court is set to overturn Roe v. Wade, which would allow states to restrict or ban abortion.

Fort Collins Police announced an investigation into the incident and said that due to the location and nature of the content of the graffiti, they are investigating the incident as a bias-motivated crime. No damage was found in the church, police said, and the scene was treated for evidence. Police have yet to announce any suspects, but have urged the public to share any information they have.

“Using fear and destruction to make a point is completely unacceptable. If you want to make your voice heard, do it by exchanging thoughts and ideas, not by committing criminal acts,” Police Chief Jeff Swoboda said in a statement.

“We need anyone with information to come forward so this suspect can be held accountable,” he continued, urging anyone with information to contact police at www.stopcriminals.org.

The appearance and style of the graffiti appears similar to that which appeared on a Catholic church building in nearby Boulder a few days earlier. Sacred Heart of Mary Parish was defaced with pro-abortion slogans on the evening of May 3, marking the second time in less than a year that the parish has been the target of such graffiti.

Pro-abortion graffiti on the doors of Sacred Heart of Mary Catholic Church in Boulder, Colorado on May 4, 2022. Archdiocese of Denver
Pro-abortion graffiti on the doors of Sacred Heart of Mary Catholic Church in Boulder, Colorado on May 4, 2022. Archdiocese of Denver

Colorado has some of the most permissive abortion laws in the country, codified by Governor Jared Polis earlier this year. The state allows abortion up to the point of birth. Boulder, about an hour south of Fort Collins, is where Warren Hern, a prolific abortionist who has performed thousands of late-term abortions, owns and operates his clinic.

Spokesperson Mark Haas told CNA that the Archdiocese of Denver has recorded at least 30 incidents of vandalism, property destruction and theft since February 2020. The Cathedral Basilica of the Immaculate Conception in Denver has been targeted by anti-Catholic slogans in October 2021.

Ruth Sent Us, an online pro-abortion advocacy group, had threatened to disrupt Catholic Masses with pro-abortion protests on Mother’s Day on Sunday. Demonstrations took place in churches in New York and Los Angeles.

The headquarters of a Madison pro-life organization – Wisconsin Family Action – was set on fire in an apparent arson attack, police said on Sunday. No one was hurt. Graffiti left outside the building read, “If abortions aren’t safe, neither are you.”

Reports of vandalism at churches and other Catholic sites appear to have increased in recent years, amid the pandemic, political protests and civil unrest. While some crimes against churches appear to be committed by the mentally ill or by minors, other crimes appear to be motivated by anti-Catholic animosity or support for abortion.

There were a series of reports in the weeks leading up to March this year, which included vandalism to Catholic Church buildings, schools and cemeteries.


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Insight: Amidst all the shouting, a civil conversation about abortion https://witheridge-devon.com/insight-amidst-all-the-shouting-a-civil-conversation-about-abortion/ Sun, 08 May 2022 08:00:35 +0000 https://witheridge-devon.com/insight-amidst-all-the-shouting-a-civil-conversation-about-abortion/ On the morning of December 30, 1994, John Salvi entered the Planned Parenthood clinic in Brookline, Massachusetts, and opened fire with a rifle. He seriously injured three people and killed the receptionist, Shannon Lowney, as she was talking on the phone. He then ran to his car and drove two miles down Beacon Street to […]]]>

On the morning of December 30, 1994, John Salvi entered the Planned Parenthood clinic in Brookline, Massachusetts, and opened fire with a rifle. He seriously injured three people and killed the receptionist, Shannon Lowney, as she was talking on the phone. He then ran to his car and drove two miles down Beacon Street to Preterm Health Services, where he started shooting again, injuring two people and killing receptionist Lee Ann Nichols.

In the aftermath of this tragedy, then-Cardinal Bernard Law and the then Governor. William Weld has called for a de-escalation of the violent rhetoric employed by both sides in abortion debates. This call represented an opportunity for visionary and philanthropist Laura Chasin, founder of the Public Conversations Project in Watertown, Massachusetts. The initiative had conducted facilitated dialogues on difficult topics, especially abortion, and they decided to raise the bar.

They interviewed dozens of leaders on both sides of the abortion chasm and selected six to participate in a dialogue. They were the president of Massachusetts Citizens for Life, the president of Massachusetts Feminists for Life, the director of the pro-life office of the Archdiocese of Boston, the CEO of Planned Parenthood of Massachusetts, the executive director of NARAL ProChoice Massachusetts and I, an Episcopal priest with a parish in Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts.

I had been involved in pro-choice activities and dialogues within and beyond The Episcopal Church for a few years. I had become, by default, the point person in the Episcopal Diocese of Massachusetts on abortion. Most priests of the time felt that this was too delicate a matter to discuss in public. And most pro-choice activists distrusted religious professionals.

I was therefore in a difficult position to occupy, but I felt called to be an integral part of my ministry. Shortly after my ordination in 1985, I was asked to speak at a national conference of abortion providers on the topic of “Abortion as a Moral Choice.” I was skeptical of how many people would attend such a panel on a beautiful spring day in Boston.

But the room was full. The people there, those who worked in the trenches of reproductive health care, were deeply grateful to learn that their work was not of the devil. I believe they felt not only validated but also forgiven. And that day, I was convinced that I had to speak out as a priest advocating for abortion as a moral choice and for women as the moral agents best able to make decisions about our reproductive decisions.

The six of us selected for the leadership project agreed to meet four times. We dated for 18 years. And now, nearly 30 years after we first met, we’re coming together again to star in a documentary about the abortion divide, set to air this summer.

We never looked for common ground or compromise. Our goals were to be able to communicate openly with our adversaries, build relationships of mutual respect, help defuse the rhetoric of the abortion controversy, and reduce the risk of further shootings. We have achieved all these objectives and many more undreamed of during these difficult first meetings. One of the biggest was co-writing an article about our experience, which the Boston Globe published in 2001.

None of this could have been accomplished without good faith, deep commitment and excellent facilitation.

We started in secret, all sworn to complete confidentiality. The other five women all feared losing the trust of their boards and constituents if it became known that they were participating in a project “across enemy lines”. As for me, I felt that I had nothing to lose, but I kept confidentiality with others, at least for a time.

HUMANITY ON BOTH SIDES

I can say so many things about these years of dialogue. This business was one of the hardest things I’ve ever done, and one of the best. It took infinite patience, never one of my strongest assets. It required huge commitments of time and energy, patience, courtesy and strict adherence to our ground rules.

The first effect of our coming together was that we became human for each other. Some of us knew oF each other on the other side of the divide, but had not met on the other side of it. I think it was more difficult and scary for pro-lifers; they came into the room thinking we were baby killers. We probably thought they were stupid. Both sides had to revise our opinions, and that was humbling.

At first, we were all asked what we thought we had to give up to participate in the dialogue. I said I thought we should give up on being right.

You mean, be fair, said one of the pro-life women.

Nope, I said, I mean be right. I think each of us has a part of the truth but none of us have it all..

We had many discussions about respect. Could we respect our adversaries if we did not respect their positions? We said we respect anti-abortion positions. They did not respect ours. For me, at least, it was a dead end. Quite late in the process, I asked the anti-abortionists if they thought that I, a priest, was a moral person. They couldn’t or wouldn’t answer that. So I don’t really feel respected.

But curiously, I feel honored by all the participants. I believe one of the great gifts we discovered was the ability to honor one another. We all deeply appreciate each other as women. We watched over each other beyond the walls of our dialogue. When one of us was harassed by a rabid pro-lifer, our dialogue friends alerted her and the FBI. We attended the funerals of each other’s husbands and brothers, sent condolence cards and had masses said when parents and other loved ones died. Former “public enemies” have become good private acquaintances, if not exactly friends.

THE GIFT OF LAUGHTER

Another gift that strengthened our bonds was the gift of laughter. As we talked in sessions, ate together, and caught up on our personal lives, witty commentary and hilarity abounded. To our surprise, we realized that we felt relaxed together, comfortable enough to crack jokes and happy with the little community we had created.

The pro-lifers talked a lot about love. They all loved children. They loved everyone. This love has always seemed to me abstract, almost cheap. But between the six of us, we have achieved, I believe, benevolence, the love that gives itself.

The experience transformed me. It has transformed us all. None of us changed our beliefs except to deepen them. Having to explain and defend our beliefs was a fairly new experience for most of us; as we see more and more in this country, we tend to associate with like-minded people who intuitively understand and share our commitments. Having to explain and defend our beliefs sharpened our understanding of them and deepened our allegiance to them.

The ability to spend long periods of time discussing with people with whom you strongly disagree, on the very issue on which you disagree, is an unusual privilege, I would even say a luxury. . I can only hope that as a society we will find more and more ways to give this gift to others.


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An overview of recent Federal Court decisions https://witheridge-devon.com/an-overview-of-recent-federal-court-decisions/ Fri, 06 May 2022 19:30:40 +0000 https://witheridge-devon.com/an-overview-of-recent-federal-court-decisions/ Case closed! Seven years ago, IJ filed a Freedom of Information Act request for all records in the IRS Asset Forfeiture Database. And we’re happy to say that this week – after an initial request from the IRS for $750,000, and then the agency reversed course and said the data was not subject to FOIA […]]]>

Case closed! Seven years ago, IJ filed a Freedom of Information Act request for all records in the IRS Asset Forfeiture Database. And we’re happy to say that this week – after an initial request from the IRS for $750,000, and then the agency reversed course and said the data was not subject to FOIA at all, and everything a bunch of litigation – the IRS finally handed over everything we asked for. Which we will use to keep the public informed. Click here to find out more.

Please enjoy the latest edition of Short Circuit, a weekly feature from the Institute for Justice.

  • Second Circuit: It’s fair to say that juror #4 in this criminal antitrust trial for alleged bid-rigging in international currency exchanges shouldn’t have released a podcast during the trial in which he admitted he had stopped paying attention to it. But it’s also fair to say that the conspirators shouldn’t have sent instant messages that literally said “conspiracies are nice”.
  • Heirs: The wise say only fools rush[to litigation]but [we] can’t help [seeking to terminate our 1983 grant of rights in our dad’s hit song “Can’t Help Falling in Love”]. Second Circuit: Like a river flows, surely to the sea, honey, so it goes. Some things [aren’t] meant to be [under the Copyright Act of 1976, which grants termination rights solely to authors].
  • Fifth Circuit: It’s one thing for a prosecutor to allow a witness to lie on the stand, but it’s another thing for a prosecutor to fabricate the witness’s testimony. Thus, a Livingston, Louisiana parish prosecutor who allegedly intimidated a witness, “barely a teenager at the time”, into repeating a false account at trial is not immune to a pursuit. Judge Ho, dubious: Absolute immunity from prosecution is probably ‘wrong as an original question’ (as is qualified and municipal immunity), but it protects this guy (and his co-defendant, a detective) .
  • One hundred and seventy-seven people walk into a bar. They are later arrested for their involvement in a fatal shooting – at Twin Peaks in Waco, Texas – and indicted by a grand jury. Many of those arrested are now suing false arrest allegations (and, others, First Amendment reprisal allegations), alleging that officers omitted exculpatory evidence to obtain arrest warrants. District Court: Even if they did, the grand jury was an “independent intermediary” that resolved any taint. Fifth circuit: Not so fast. While the grand jury was also misled by the officers, the taint has not been resolved. Referral is necessary.
  • The man is arrested, spent four days in jail, his apartment searched and his phone and laptop seized after he created a satirical Facebook profile for the Parma, Ohio police department. His alleged crime? Using a computer to disrupt police activities. But a jury acquits (and the Internet awards the department the Censorious Asshat of the Year 2016 award). Can the man sue the First Amendment, among other things, against the officers? Sixth Circuit: Look, maybe the Facebook page was protected speech, maybe not. Hard to say. But what we do know is that there was no clearly established violation here. Qualified immunity for officers.
  • Does it violate the Eighth Amendment to house male and female inmates together? The Sixth Circuit says no, so a woman impregnated by another inmate (who had prior violent tendencies) while in a facility for seriously mentally ill inmates cannot sue Wayne County, Michigan.
  • The Supreme Court has (un)famously interpreted the commerce clause as applying to just about anything anywhere in the country, no matter how local and unrelated to commerce. But that’s technically the “internal trade clause”. There is also the “foreign trade clause”. Is it also flexible? Sixth Circuit: Fortunately, the Supreme Court never went there, so we’ll say no. And so should treaties. However, the Supreme Court possesses gone there, so this defendant who sexually abused children overseas loses.
  • In 1990, the Supreme Court ruled that mandatory bar dues (lawyer-like, not pub-like) do not violate the First Amendment. In 2018, however, the Court ruled that mandatory public sector union dues To do violate the First Amendment. Wisconsin attorney: Which means the 1990 bar dues ruling is no longer good law. Seventh Circuit: Who is above our pay grade. The Supreme Court doesn’t like lower courts to find its precedent “overturned by implication,” so your beef is with One First Street in DC, not 219 South Dearborn in Chicago.
  • In the past 30 years, a Mexican national has been expelled from the United States seven times. Hoping the eighth time will be the charm – and only 10 days after his last takedown – he scales a border fence and is almost immediately spotted by a Marine Corps unit using night vision to monitor the border. The Marines alert Border Patrol agents, who quickly arrest the man. But wait! Did the Marines violate Posse Comitatus law, which prohibits the military from assisting in civilian law enforcement? Ninth Circuit: No, the law provides exceptions for assistance authorized by Congress, and Congress in 2016 authorized the Secretary of Defense to deploy ground surveillance at the border.
  • Allegation: A Nevada inmate reports severe pain during urination, but medical officials are taking a “wait and see” approach to treatment. When he finally arrives in hospital three years later, doctors drain 14 pounds of fluid from his bladder and urinary system and, despite surgery, he now has long-term problems. Ninth Circuit: “It is true that we did not find a four-legged case with the factual background presented here.” But no qualified immunity.
  • Ravalli County, Mt. officials hand a $50,000 “offer of judgment” to the man suing them for his arrest and night in jail. But wait! Before the end of the man’s 14-day window to consider the offer, a judge rules for the county and the county withdraws the offer. Ninth circuit: no, the offer is valid for 14 days. Pay the man.
  • It is clearly stated that officers cannot tase, punch, choke or kneel on suspects after they have been subdued. But what about pepper spray? The Tenth Circuit says that is clearly established as well. So no qualified immunity for these three officers from Tulsa, Okla., including a recruit and his training officer. And the district court must also reconsider the municipal liability action.
  • Denver prohibits camping on public property, which authorities enforce through homeless camp sweeps. In 2016, a group of homeless people sued, alleging that the sweeps, which were carried out without notice and destroyed personal property, violated due process. The parties settled the case, establishing detailed protocols for enforcing the city’s camping ban. But the sweeps continued, allegedly without the protocols required by the regulations. District Court: Stop it, city. Tenth Circuit: Not only is the settlement agreement to be enforced in state court, but its terms exclude the claims brought in this lawsuit. Dissent: The city did not raise the exclusion in its appeal, and we should not raise it for them.
  • In 2015, federal contractors dumped 3 million gallons of wastewater from a former gold mine near Durango, Colorado, into a creek, turning it to mustard-yellow water downstream. You may have seen it in the news. Regardless, the Tenth Circuit says some downstream owners’ state law negligence claims were filed too late. Although their action was brought in New Mexico (where the statute of limitations is three years), under the Clean Water Act the relevant statute of limitations is Colorado (two years).
  • And in en banc news, the Fifth Circuit no longer needs to en banc review whether the single-director structure of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau violates Article II of the Constitution and the Constitution’s separation of powers, because the Supreme Court ruled that it did, like, two years ago.
  • And in more pew news, the Ninth Circuit will reconsider its decision preliminary banning a 2019 California law that required the closure of private detention facilities in the state, including those used by the federal government (while allowing certain private establishments used by the State to remain open).
  • And in a brief amicus novella, IJ asks the Michigan Supreme Court to rule that suppressing evidence gleaned from an unconstitutional search is just as appropriate in civil code enforcement proceedings as it is in criminal proceedings. Indeed, it is the only remedy available to the defendants in the case, who could face fines of $500 a day after Long Lake Twp. officials have secretly flown a drone over their property for three years (without a warrant) to collect evidence of what they consider a public nuisance (junk cars and other objects not visible to the public ).

Victory! Last month, the North Carolina Court of Appeals unanimously ruled that a Wilmington ordinance prohibiting more than 2% of the city’s residential properties from being used as short-term vacation rentals, spread by lottery, violates state law. Which is great news for IJ clients David and Peg Schroeder, who spent $75,000 remodeling a townhouse before the city passed the ordinance and then lost the lottery. The decision is now final and this week the city council voted to reimburse more than $500,000 in fees collected while the ordinance was in effect. Read all in the Port City Daily.

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Boris Johnson faces his first serious election test since his reputation hit rock bottom https://witheridge-devon.com/boris-johnson-faces-his-first-serious-election-test-since-his-reputation-hit-rock-bottom/ Wed, 04 May 2022 11:22:00 +0000 https://witheridge-devon.com/boris-johnson-faces-his-first-serious-election-test-since-his-reputation-hit-rock-bottom/ The vote comes as Johnson and his ruling Conservatives are surrounded by scandals and crises so serious that members of his own party have publicly called for his resignation. Indeed, the most pressing of those scandals, which saw Johnson fined by police for breaking his own Covid rules during the 2020 lockdown, could have led […]]]>

The vote comes as Johnson and his ruling Conservatives are surrounded by scandals and crises so serious that members of his own party have publicly called for his resignation. Indeed, the most pressing of those scandals, which saw Johnson fined by police for breaking his own Covid rules during the 2020 lockdown, could have led to his ousting from office under normal circumstances.

And yet, Johnson has proven time and time again that he is unique among politicians and capable of rolling every punch. What is unknown at this time is whether any of those punches, while failing to knock out the Prime Minister, caused enough damage for Johnson to ultimately be convicted.

A brief glimpse of the wreckage currently surrounding Johnson would be enough to make most throw in the towel.

The numerous incidents involved in the Partygate scandal, for which Johnson has previously been found guilty of breaking the law, are still under investigation by police. Further fines have been imposed on people who worked with the Prime Minister in Downing Street and it is entirely possible that Johnson could be fined again.

Once the police are done, senior civil servant Sue Gray will release her full report into the scandal, which is likely to be very critical of Johnson, if the parts already released are to be believed.

Johnson is also haunting the prospect that he will be found guilty of willfully misleading Parliament when, in response to allegations of lockdown-breaking gatherings in Downing Street, he told lawmakers the rules were followed at all times. According to the ministerial code, such an eventuality would normally lead to a resignation.

The sense of crisis surrounding Johnson’s premiership goes far beyond Partygate.

His party was accused of having a serious problem with misogyny last week, after one of his backbenchers told the Mail on Sunday newspaper anonymously that Angela Rayner, deputy leader of the Labor Party of opposition, had tried to distract Johnson in the House of Commons by crossing and uncrossing her legs, similar to Sharon Stone’s character in the movie “Basic Instinct.”

Rayner described the claims as “despicable lies” and tweeted that “Boris Johnson’s cheerleaders have resorted to spreading desperate and evil smears in their doomed attempts to save his ass.” Johnson himself criticized the Mail story as “appalling and misogynistic guts” and said he would unleash the “terrors of the earth” on the source if found.

And on Saturday, another lawmaker from Johnson’s party, Neil Parish, said he would resign after admitting to watching pornography on multiple occasions in the House of Commons.

Meanwhile, 56 MPs are currently under investigation for sexual misconduct, with members of Johnson’s cabinet believed by government insiders to be on the list.

Add to all that a Brexit-related cost-of-living crisis and Johnson’s fate heading into this election looks grim. UK inflation is at its highest level in 30 years and the Prime Minister’s critics have accused him of having no serious response to the crisis.

When asked in an interview on Tuesday to give advice to an elderly widow whose energy bills had risen so much that she had to take the bus all day to stay warm, Johnson began his answer taking credit for introducing free bus passes when he was Mayor of London.

While the precariousness of his situation is not evident on a day-to-day basis, it was starkly underscored earlier this month when he had to withdraw an amendment to a motion that would allow a parliamentary inquiry into Partygate because, despite his parliamentary majority of 75, the government was not sufficiently convinced that a sufficient number of deputies would support the Prime Minister.

“Put simply, the whips didn’t know they didn’t have the votes to back the prime minister,” said a veteran Tory MP. “If MPs don’t talk to the whips, then you’re in serious trouble.”

UK Conservative politician resigns after admitting watching porn in Parliament

Despite all that, it’s still unclear whether Johnson should step down or be sacked – and some believe it’s entirely possible he’ll fight in the next general election in 2024.

How can this be the case with so many immediate perils?

First, local elections may not be as dire as many around Johnson fear. “Local elections ask voters a different set of questions than national elections,” says Chris Curtis, head of political polling at Opinium Research.

“People could vote for a local councilor they know, like and see as being a million miles from Westminster. It’s harder for MPs who have to defend the Prime Minister in parliament,” he adds .

Essentially, the results of this election may not reflect the broad voter dissatisfaction with Johnson, which features in national polls virtually every week. In other words, they might not be the irrefutable gun that MPs who want to get rid of Johnson need to finally act.

“A lot of us are very angry, but we know that getting rid of another prime minister is not a good idea. We need a really good reason to justify it to the public and I don’t think just not that these election results will be,” says a former Conservative cabinet minister.

There is also a growing feeling among Tory MPs that even the Gray report on Partygate may not be enough to force Johnson out of office, because the longer the story goes on, the less MPs think the public cares.

For Johnson’s fiercest critics, that leaves them with a worst-case scenario: a chaotic government they cannot unseat just as the cost of living crisis hits millions of Britons.

And while the cost of living crisis is driven by multiple factors, including the resumption of the pandemic and the war in Ukraine, there is one element that is unique to the UK: Brexit.

A report published last week by UK in a Changing Europe, an independent research body, estimated that since the UK left the European Union’s single market and customs union in January 2021, prices for food increased by 6%. If this trend continues, it could be particularly damaging for Johnson, the man who led the campaign to leave the EU.

Boris Johnson's economic bragging obscures the painful truth

“People who say the cost of living has nothing to do with Brexit are in denial,” says Jonathan Portes, professor of economics at King’s College London. “In the long term, it reduces imports and exports and it risks making us a little poorer than we would have been otherwise.

There is no doubt that the next general election will be determined by how the outgoing government, Johnson-led or not, handles this cost-of-living crisis.

For many Conservative MPs, this is causing sleepless nights. Many simply don’t think Johnson is capable of meeting the challenges the UK currently faces and privately hope the Gray report has something serious enough that they can finally get rid of him, ideally… September.

Until that happens, Johnson remains in power but his authority is badly damaged. The public, according to polls, largely believes he is untrustworthy, while his own backbenchers cannot be counted on to back him up.

Those who want him out are hoping he quits, even though, to date, Johnson has ruled him out. All of this means that the Conservative Party finds itself in the unenviable position of not being strong enough to fire its leader, who in turn is not strong enough to command the loyalty of its MPs.

Johnson could still overthrow everything, but the longer it goes on, the more the stench of inevitable death around him and his government will fester, making the prospect of fighting the next election unenviable even for those with a stomach. The Strongest.

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